Open Access Tenure Archive

Open Access Tenure: I Got It

Posted July 13, 2017 By Abigail Goben

The TL/DR version of this blog post: The Board of Trustees voted today to approve the tenure of myself and my peers at other colleges who were presented to them. I owe a lot of thanks to the many people who supported me through the last 6.5 years.

The long version….

CONFETTI BOMB!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

My Dean just emailed the Library Faculty listserv to notify us that by verbal vote, my tenure has been confirmed. Along with quite a number of other colleagues from different colleges here at UIC, I am now (as of August 15, 2017 –our new contract year) an Associate Professor with Tenure.

For the record: you can publish your research in open access journals and get tenure at a “Highest Research/Doctoral Granting” (R1) institution.

This has been a tremendously long six and a half years and this, like every other major accomplishment comes from the support that I’ve received from a very long list of colleagues, peers, collaborators, family, and friends.

The Philosopher tops the list of people who need to be thanked. He has spent six years seeing me through all of the paperwork, the research, the crying, and the banging of head against desk. He’s listened to my research ideas, converted a wall into a whiteboard, edited many things, and been my biggest support and cheerleader throughout. Second only to him is the Incredibly-Patient-Mother, who has undertaken the tremendous task of regularly showing up, confirming my continued sanity, making sure I have houseplants that are still alive, and ensuring that I don’t just wallow in our home office.

There are many people at my institution who have been supportive. I didn’t go into this facing a hostile P&T committee, though I was told that no extra credit would be given for my open access goals. My Dean knew what I was doing and was encouraging. Day to day my department colleagues and peers across the library and campus made sure to let me know they had my back. I could not have done all of this without Rebecca, Val, Cleo, Felicia, Tina, Francis, Stephen, or Carol–who took that first risk by hiring me.

My research and writing colleagues agreed to pursue this with me: Lisa, Kristin, Dorothea, Rebecca, Amy, Alison, and Megan. I have had the pleasure to write with  absolutely top notch co-authors. My research would not have happened without them.

My community has had my back. Many peers reached out to encourage me over the years and to give me advice, support, and cheers from around the globe. They shared with me whether procedures were weird because it’s my library, it’s my university, or it’s just tenure weirdness (sometimes all three). I’m grateful to SPARC and PLOS — who explicitly made sure that I knew that they were watching and supporting my efforts.

My profession made this relatively straightforward. Library and Information Science has a wealth of excellent gold open access journals to publish in. There never was some arbitrary trade off for me to make between the mystical perception of “journal quality” and open access. Nor was I ever facing page fees, hybrid fees, or APCs.

My friends have lived through stories, understanding that yes, I really am sitting at home writing this weekend rather than coming out; that I’m stressed because I’m on yet another evaluation deadline; that I need to describe the details of the ridiculous minutia for a fifth time. They’ve celebrated at each step, offered to edit, bought me drinks, helped me find opportunities, and were present. AudioGirl, M, Andromeda, Deb, Evviva, and the best writing-in-bars-buddy-ever Jess have been there through it all.

I could keep writing names–and I’m sure I’m going to hit Publish and immediately recall and be mortified of someone I didn’t include. Please, please know I remember all of your support and I appreciate it.

Several people have asked what is next. Some have said “take a year off, relax!” and that of course isn’t me. I have so many things I still want to do, to try, and to fix. Things I couldn’t do as junior faculty or just things that I haven’t yet had time for. How all that plays out I don’t yet know. But we’ll find out…

If you would like to see my dossier, it’s open and available for your download and reading here. I see absolutely no point in keeping it secret.

I continue to have my set goal that library research goes in open access journals. My collaborative research with other disciplines (where I’m not first author)–that goes automatically into our institutional repository. And no, that’s never been a problem either, not with journals, not with co-authors.

I did it. I believe others can too. Please let me know how I can support you in pursuing OA Tenure. And thank you for reading along.

 

 

Open Access Tenure: What Goes Forth

Posted November 7, 2016 By Abigail Goben

Last week I received notification from my Dean that I passed the final Library vote on my promotion and tenure dossier with the unanimous support from my colleagues. Now, I go to campus.

A friend asked me what exactly those words mean (all English but in that order?). All tenured Library faculty at UIC have read through my papers, my files, letters of recommendation, etc–and have voted on me three times. This was the final vote and now my dossier will be proofread, floofed, and edited a smidgeon more before a committee of tenured faculty members at the UIC Campus level will read it and vote on it. This means faculty from Chemistry, Dentistry, Urban Planning, etc reading, evaluating and voting.

Because there are so many disciplines and as the standards for each discipline wildly vary, I will be evaluated only by my college’s standards–the Library standards. Those go with my packet and someone from another college will do a fine tooth comb reading and make a presentation to the committee, the rest of whom do a lighter reading. So, a  Bioengineering faculty member or a History professor may be finding out a lot about research data management policy and RDM self-education. The tenured Library faculty member who sits on the campus committee cannot speak for or against my case. They can only answer direct questions. I’m told in the past, they had to stand in the hallway during the discussion of the candidate.

I’ve not gone back through all the forms again in the past couple of weeks. I need to–one more time–and to email my long-suffering paperwork person and the Dean’s assistant with any little tweaks. But as promised, I’ve got a public version of my dossier ready for anyone who is interested in reading it.

Goben 6Y Public Dossier

As usual, this isn’t entirely what I turned in. Works in progress have been removed and you’ll need to go through my CV on my About Me page to get to full text of my research.

My statements have been drastically overhauled, so if you’re interested in seeing the biggest changes, look there. My committee participation list is mostly just longer, as is my teaching list.

Countdown to the Board of Trustees vote (which comes after campus vote in February) will continue through the end of July 2017. But things are moving forward and the future looks bright!

Open Access Tenure: Hurdle In Sight…

Posted October 24, 2016 By Abigail Goben

Thursday is the last Library vote on my tenure dossier. It’s my final College vote where my tenured Library colleagues will recommend to my Dean whether or not my package goes forward to campus in January. They’ve been deliberating all fall, so hopefully it will be a fast meeting? I don’t know when exactly I’ll get the results, probably within a week or two.

My external reviewer letters were back in September* and the fall has seen myriad rounds of edits and not a little process frustration squeezed into the usual chaos that is Fall Semester. Teaching, new students, new research, new projects–and proofreading my papers another time, one more time, tweaking a date here when something comes out, moving two more book chapters from the accepted column to the published column.

At the moment I feel very abstracted from the process. My “final” dossier went to the library a week and a half ago and since then I’ve been through a conference, a personal trip, and a B1G Homecoming Weekend (minus the actual football game itself). I know the vote is coming but it still feels far away. That will probably change Thursday morning.

I am putting together my 6Y-Public-Dossier for those who are following along and I’ll have that up for download after I hear about the vote.

In the interim, I’m not writing enough…but what academic ever is?

*I wish I could read those. Could they strip out the names?

Open Access Tenure: View From the Six Month Mark

Posted June 8, 2016 By Abigail Goben

Approximately six months from now my Dean will send off my dossier to campus and I will not have any further opportunity to update my case.

There are still a number of big important dates to face down between now and then and considering how fast the first five months of the year have gone, I don’t expect that the rest of 2016 is going to seem particularly long.

Right now I’m working on the packet for my external reviewers, which will go out around the time I leave to attend ALA Annual in about two weeks.

For that I’m preparing:

  • My research statement– updates from things I’ve done in the past six months and where further research is going. This will be the final version of this statement, unedited after it goes to them so it has to be shiny.
  • My interdisciplinary statement — same thing, only including all the dentistry research, and particularly including the paper that I got pulled into after my 5Y dossier went in. I didn’t even know that project existed and now we’re in revisions and hoping for an acceptance in August/September.
  • PDFs of all everything I’ve published (just have to check the folder where I keep all of those)
  • CV — This will be easiest as I update it regularly. One addition: I don’t put “papers under review” on my vita as it’s an openly readable Google doc and I don’t want a reviewer stumbling across it and unblinding themselves accidentally. Because I cannot send those manuscripts to the reviewers, I will put them here in addition to the other stuff so they can see what’s coming next.

Reviewer letters are due back by September 1. I will never see the feedback nor know who those reviewers are, unless they happen to self-identify to me after the process.

We just got the draft calendar for this year, it won’t be finalized until later in the fall but I have three deadlines before then, so I’m working from that.

Other deadlines:

  1. August 19: Draft of my full dossier goes to Library P&T. They get to tell me to change commas, move clauses, etc. I can agree or not agree to their suggestions.
  2. September 12: The Dean emails my co-authors and asks about my contributions to our papers. Which reminds me, I have another set of co-authors I have to warn about that.
  3. September 16: Second draft of dossier goes to Library P&T. Again more revisions that I can accept or not (I have heard rumors of “Move X from Page Y to Page Z”–two weeks later– “Move X from Page Z to Page Y”… ) 
  4. October 14: Dossier goes to the Library P&T again.
  5. November 2: Final Vote by Library P&T
  6. January 2: The Dean sends my dossier to campus P&T

There’s a little bit of space from 11/2-1/2 where, if anything else is accepted or submitted, I can update that but from what I can tell things should be done minus reading 50 more times for typos.

So that’s the current tenure hurdles, let me know if you have process questions!

Open Access Tenure: Out of My Hands Briefly

Posted November 30, 2015 By Abigail Goben

And with a link to a Box folder, the dossier is turned in once more. I have no more deadlines to meet for my 5Y year and that feels a little odd. Very nice–absolutely–but odd.

I’ve again made most of my dossier public, if you’d like to read or review any of it.

What is included:

  • my CV (always public, see the link to the live version on my About Me page)
  • a list of annotated publications and their impact (note the Altmetrics!)
  • my statements
  • my librarianship accomplishments (the things that comprise my day job)
  • the campus forms (teaching evals, lists of committees, etc)

What isn’t there:

  • a folder of PDFs of all of my published work. It’s all open, save one book chapter, but the committee requests PDFs of everything so each committee member need not go chasing it down.
  • research in draft– I’ve got some book chapters sitting with editors and a couple of papers underway. Anything submitted, P&T got a PDF, anything underway they got a one page summary.
  • anything written by anyone else. We don’t have/recruit external letters of support, so I don’t have those. My peer teaching evaluation and my evaluation of librarianship are written by colleagues here and while I have a copy, it is strongly preferred that I don’t post those externally.

So now you’re done, right?  If I had a dollar for each time on this question, my student loan balance would be a lot lower.

Not yet, though I am at something of a brief pause.  On January 28, the University Library Promotion and Tenure Committee will vote on my dossier. I’ll meet with my Dean a few weeks after that (calendar tetris, woohoo!) to discuss the outcome of the vote. That vote is the faculty’s confidence in whether I should be submitted for external review.**

Then my Paperwork person will spend the rest of spring with me fluffing things, sending out any more papers I can get finished and accepted, and the Library trying to identify who they’d like as my external reviewers–who will then have the summer to read my research and comment on it.  AFAIK, they get that folder of PDFs, my CV, and my research statement. Nothing else.

The letters come back in the fall and then on November 4 is the final internal vote (4 internal votes altogether). It’s the 5.5 vote, if you will, and is the last make or break before sending my dossier to campus. Then some further formatting etc etc etc and somewhere around the first of January 2017 my dean will send my dossier to campus for a vote by the University Promotion and Tenure Committee in February 2017.

Head spinning yet? Me too.

But today, it’s out of my hands. I might get a question or two from the committee but I don’t need to wallow over anything for a few weeks, just forward any particularly interesting updates to my paperwork person as she prepares to present my case. Now I just get to focus on writing the two papers I’ve been neglecting and a to-do list that keeps threatening to drown me.

 

**If I fail that or any other votes, I’ll get a one year terminal contract starting with the next academic year (Aug 2016 or 2017) and I’ll be actively job hunting.